Alienation - Currently no debate

Currently no general definition


Associated practices:
Literary theory - Sociology

Alienation in Literary theory

Alienation-effect is a much used distorting translation of Berthold Brecht’s term verfremdungseffekt. This is better translated as distancing-effect, as alienation has, in common use, a phsychological and sociological import that Brecht certainly did not intend. He intended to describe a technique of distancing the audience from intense involvement in the action of a play, in order to encourage and enable them to reflect objectively on the content, themes and messages inherent in that action.

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Alienation in Sociology

Enstrangement

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A term that has several different meanings historically.  In general, alienation refers to the sense of distance from nature, separation from others, and helplessness that is an effect of modern existence.  

IMarxist theory, alienation is a specific condition of capitalism in which humans experience a sense of separation from the product of their labour, and hence all aspects of life including human relations.  

In psychoanalytic theory, alienation refers to split subjectivity and the discovery of the fact that one is not in control of one’s thoughts, actions, and desires because of the existence of the unconscious.

Sturken M., & Cartwright, L. (2001). In Practices of Looking: an introduction to visual culture. New York: Oxford University Press.

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